Wayne Avrashow knows all about politics.    He was the campaign manager for two successful Los Angeles City Council campaigns and a Deputy/Chief of Staff to those two elected City Council members. He served as a senior advisor for a successful city-wide referendum in the City of Los Angeles, co-authored ballot arguments on Los Angeles County-wide measures, served as Chairman for a Los Angeles County ballot measure, and was a Los Angeles government Commissioner for nearly twenty years. He currently serves as a Board Member of the Yaroslavsky Institute, a public policy institute founded by long time Southern California elected official, and now UCLA professor, Zev Yaroslavsky.

A practicing attorney, he specializes in government advocacy, real estate, and business law. Formerly, he was an officer in two real estate development firms.  As a lawyer-lobbyist, he has represented clients before numerous California municipalities and in Nevada and Idaho. His background in politics, government, business, and law provides unique insight into the machinations and characters that populate political campaigns.

He has lectured at his law school and taught at Woodbury University in Los Angeles. He has also authored numerous op-ed articles that appeared in daily newspapers, legal, business, and real estate publications.  In addition, he is the author of a self-published book for the legal community, Success at Mediation—10 Strategic Tools for Attorneys.

His inspiration to write Roll the Dice came from political thriller and intrigue novels such as Allen Drury’s Advise and Consent (1959); Robert Penn Warren’s  All the King’s Men (1946), Absolute Power by David Baldacci (1995), and Primary Colors by Joe Klein (1996), as well as the current Netflix television series House of Cards. Roll the Dice is geared toward those who are interested in politics, social affairs, rock music, and current events. It is designed as a “good read”, similar to books written by John Grisham, James Patterson, David Baldacci and other contemporary authors.