Democratic Agenda: Resist And Oppose

How did we lose to him?

               That is the question that haunts the Democratic Party in the era of Trump.  Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer was roundly criticized when he dared to answer that question.  While impolite, he was accurate in citing the unpopularity of Hillary Clinton as one of the main causes. 

                  What now—how should the Dems move forward?

                  Recent national polls confirm that by a substantial margin the American people believe the Democratic Party’s main purpose is to stand against President Trump; rather than stand for something.  The opposition party has become nothing more or less than— the opposition.  The recently announced agenda, “A Better Deal,” is but a mishmash of previous policies. 

                  In my upcoming novel Roll the Dice, rock star Tyler Sloan runs as an Independent candidate for Nevada’s United States Senate seat.  Sloan campaigned without the support or shackles of the two political parties.  Sloan had ideas both left and right, he was not in the mushy middle.  Sloan campaigned for gun control and advocated freezing new regulations on businesses. He had ideas. 

                  In the early days of the Trump administration, Senator Schumer supported a few of Trump’s cabinet nominees and was greeted with protesters in front of his Brooklyn residence demanding that, “Get a spine Chuck.”   

                  Is “growing a spine” only defined as full throated opposition?  Or, can a party pass the “spine test” by protecting its values and form a bipartisan coalition to enact legislation on tax reform, health care, infrastructure, or something?

                  While an alternative band of Democratic Party policies would be the right formula for a political science salon; don’t bet on the Dems working with Trump or the Republicans on any major domestic legislation.   The Party has determined that resistance + opposition==a winning formula.

                  The Republicans ran against Obama and had success in both the 2010 and 2014 midterm elections.  Midterm elections are usually a referendum on the party in power.  It is the classic, “throw the bums out,” argument.

                  In an eerie resemblance to Democratic frustration that the GOP were mere obstructionists and “The Party of No” to President Obama; the Democrats are a more modern version.  As long as Trump and the Republicans are fractured; and are fumbling andbumbling, unable to enact substantial legislation, the obstructionist party may prevail in 2018.

                  Roll the Dice is set for publication in November.  If the Dems and Reeps fail to solve national problems,  check out Tyler Sloan as he battles against the entrenched opposition with his personality and policies building a winning coalition of voters across the political spectrum.    

The first law of holes is, “when your opponent is digging a hole, you don’t take away a shovel.” The Dems are content to witness a Republican Party with fractures and fissures, led by a President battling clouds of investigation and of his own chaotic style.  

                  Six million people voted for Obama in 2012 and Trump in 2016. Those flip voters are the key to both parties’ chances moving forward.  To reach these voters, the Dems need to; run a candidate that can relate more to voters outside of its base; a candidate able to drive turnout within the base, lure Sanders and Trump voters who desire to shake the system, and, most of all, develop a coherent message to reach working-class voters.

                  Rather than introduce healthcare legislation to address the flaws of the Affordable Care Act; or propose a plan on infrastructure, the Dems are more likely to sit on their hands.  While the body politic may suffer, the fates of the Democratic Party may rise. 

How did we lose to him?

                  That is the question that haunts the Democratic Party in the era of Trump.  Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer was roundly criticized when he dared to answer that question.  While impolite, he was accurate in citing the unpopularity of Hillary Clinton as one of the main causes. 

                  What now—how should the Dems move forward?

                  Recent national polls confirm that by a substantial margin the American people believe the Democratic Party’s main purpose is to stand against President Trump; rather than stand for something.  The opposition party has become nothing more or less than— the opposition.  The recently announced agenda, “A Better Deal,” is but a mishmash of previous policies. 

                  In my upcoming novel Roll the Dice, rock star Tyler Sloan runs as an Independent candidate for Nevada’s United States Senate seat.  Sloan campaigned without the support or shackles of the two political parties.  Sloan had ideas both left and right, he was not in the mushy middle.  Sloan campaigned for gun control and advocated freezing new regulations on businesses. He had ideas. 

                  In the early days of the Trump administration, Senator Schumer supported a few of Trump’s cabinet nominees and was greeted with protesters in front of his Brooklyn residence demanding that, “Get a spine Chuck.”   

                  Is “growing a spine” only defined as full throated opposition?  Or, can a party pass the “spine test” by protecting its values and form a bipartisan coalition to enact legislation on tax reform, health care, infrastructure, or something?

                  While an alternative band of Democratic Party policies would be the right formula for a political science salon; don’t bet on the Dems working with Trump or the Republicans on any major domestic legislation.   The Party has determined that resistance + opposition==a winning formula.

                  The Republicans ran against Obama and had success in both the 2010 and 2014 midterm elections.  Midterm elections are usually a referendum on the party in power.  It is the classic, “throw the bums out,” argument.

                  In an eerie resemblance to Democratic frustration that the GOP were mere obstructionists and “The Party of No” to President Obama; the Democrats are a more modern version.  As long as Trump and the Republicans are fractured; and are fumbling andbumbling, unable to enact substantial legislation, the obstructionist party may prevail in 2018.

                  Roll the Dice is set for publication in November.  If the Dems and Reeps fail to solve national problems,  check out Tyler Sloan as he battles against the entrenched opposition with his personality and policies building a winning coalition of voters across the political spectrum.    

The first law of holes is, “when your opponent is digging a hole, you don’t take away a shovel.” The Dems are content to witness a Republican Party with fractures and fissures, led by a President battling clouds of investigation and of his own chaotic style.  

                  Six million people voted for Obama in 2012 and Trump in 2016. Those flip voters are the key to both parties’ chances moving forward.  To reach these voters, the Dems need to; run a candidate that can relate more to voters outside of its base; a candidate able to drive turnout within the base, lure Sanders and Trump voters who desire to shake the system, and, most of all, develop a coherent message to reach working-class voters.

                  Rather than introduce healthcare legislation to address the flaws of the Affordable Care Act; or propose a plan on infrastructure, the Dems are more likely to sit on their hands.  While the body politic may suffer, the fates of the Democratic Party may rise.